Ken Hamblin

The amount dispensaries charge for an ounce of cannabis in Colorado varies radically from place to place.

As evidence, check out the latest Colorado numbers from PriceofWeed.com, which uses a crowdsourcing approach to gathering its data.

The priciest figures for high-quality marijuana are more than twice as hefty as the lowest ones — and the farther a buyer is from the Denver metro-area (or, in one instance, Colorado Springs), the likelier he or she is to pay a premium price.

Of course, the term “high-quality” is imprecise, and costs vary from place to place in any community with multiple dispensaries. But the digits still indicate that importance of location, location, location.

tinctures.800Westword

Dear Stoner: I just got some pot brownies, and I’m not planning to ingest them for two weeks. Do you think the potency will still be the same, and if they’ll be okay to eat? Can I heat them up if they go hard?Tasnim

Dear Tasnim: We’ve talked to multiple cannabis bakeries and kitchens about the shelf life of edibles, and all of them have said that edibles are pretty hard to tarnish in terms of potency, so two weeks definitely wouldn’t be long enough to harm your brownies. The “normal” ingredients in them are what you need to worry about, because they’ll decay much faster on your kitchen counter than THC would. Throw the brownies in the freezer if you’re scared of spoilage, but that’s just to fend off mold, not THC degradation. Freezing definitely beats food poisoning — and what a waste of pot that would be!

Take care when heating up frozen edibles — which usually have the texture of cold turds — as THC will slowly start to fade at temperatures over 200 degrees Fahrenheit (and die altogether at 392 degrees Fahrenheit). But most microwaves don’t take food above 212 degrees, so there shouldn’t be any noticeable difference in potency after the short fifteen seconds it takes to warm your brownie. Throw a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top or wash it down with a fatty glass of whole milk to increase the effects.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I hate dry pot. My roommate says he puts his on the bathroom counter, turns the shower on hot and lets the steam bring it back to life. Thoughts?
Monte

Dear Monte: Few things are worse than pinching a bud and seeing it crumble to dust — as so many of your dreams have. But cheer up: We’re here to help. First, dump whoever is selling you withered pot. This isn’t Kansas; there are plenty of people selling healthy weed in Colorado. If you need to resuscitate some dying nugs, though, don’t use the shower method. It’s not a bad idea in theory, but I’ve heard stories of mold appearing after this procedure. Besides, there are other options that use much less water.

Skin your favorite citrus and put a few of the peels in a jar (no bags) with the dry herb for a day, shaking the jar every few hours and burping it for fresh air. Or substitute slices of bread, lettuce leaves or tortillas for the citrus; they’ll do the same trick and won’t add a fruity flavor. You should only need a little of whatever you’re using; check the buds frequently to make sure they’re not getting too wet. My favorite method is to throw one or two fresh, damp buds in with the dry ones and let them spread the moisture. Keep trying until you find a system that works for you.

pueblo.heroin.meth.bust.2.800.croppedPueblo County Sheriff's Office

Earlier this year, High Times announced that it would move its annual Cannabis Cup to Pueblo after it was forced to relocate the event from Denver. And while the plan subsequently fell apart (and the Cup headed to California, at least temporarily), the idea of the Cup in Pueblo made sense since the community has been viewed as one of the more marijuana-friendly in Colorado.

But that reputation appears to be changing in a big way.

The number of busts aimed at allegedly illegal marijuana growshas skyrocketed in the city, with another one taking place this week. Since mid-March, the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office has reportedly confiscated 5,900 marijuana plans and arrested 35 people in 25 homes.

Meanwhile, the PCSO has announced the breakup of a drug-trafficking operation with alleged links to a Mexican cartel — the conclusion of a months-long investigation that led to multiple seizures of methamphetamine, plus cocaine and heroin.

Willie Nelson at Red RocksBrandon Marshall

Willie Nelson has been an advocate for pot enthusiasts everywhere and championed the legalization of marijuana for decades. This summer his new company, Willie’s Reserve, is making his love of weed official.

Pot enthusiasts who flock to Willie’s shows “happily shared the bounty from their home gardens and local communities (and) Willie happily returned the favor,” according to the company’s website.

Now, using independent farmers, Nelson and his team are developing a variety of strains and testing different cultivation methods and recipes.

Everything sold will be hand-picked by Nelson himself.

Despite continuous warnings from alarmists who say heavy marijuana use is “soaring among young people,” the most recent survey conducted by Healthy Kids Colorado Survey (HKCS) found marijuana is less of a threat to the state’s youth than other substances. HKCS is supported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and collects anonymous student information on multiple health topics.

Trends among high school students remain comparable to the national average and have not risen since the state voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2014. In fact, the numbers have remained relatively stable since 2005, according to the report.

Four out of five high school students have not used marijuana in the last 30 days, a statistic that, according to the survey, “remains relatively unchanged since 2013.”

Even though more than half of Colorado’s high school students report that marijuana is easy to access, well below half have actually tried the drug.

Of the 17,000 middle and high school students from over 157 schools surveyed across the state, 21.2 percent reported that they currently use marijuana. With the national average at 21.7 percent, this survey corroborates prior evidence that legalization has not increased use among teens.

Alcohol remains the most used substance by minors across the state, a statistic that aligns with national trends. Thirty percent of Colorado’s youth report that they currently drink alcohol and 16 percent said they’ve gone on a binge in the last 30 days. Almost 60 percent say alcohol is relatively easy to acquire.

For more on the marijuana statistics in the survey, read Michael Robert’s article.

Last year, for example, Project SAM, an organization co-founded by former representative Patrick Kennedy and launched in Denver, claimed that national figures from the Department of Health and Human Services showed “heavy marijuana use” was “soaring among young people,” when the stats actually demonstrated that the overall number had dropped substantially. After being called out by the Washington Post, Project SAM withdrew its original press release on the topic.

That could explain why the 2015 Health Kids Colorado Survey, just issued by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (see it below), underlines “not” in the grabbiest weed-related finding in the report: “Four out of five Colorado high school students have not used marijuana in the last thirty days.”

Other findings are similar — yet plenty of people continue to believe that the 2012 passage of Amendment 64, which legalized limited recreational marijuana sales to adults in Colorado, has caused the sort of teen-toking explosion about which Project SAM has been concerned. And Mason Tvert, an A64 proponent who’s now the director of communication for the Marijuana Policy Project, thinks he knows why.

california-democrats-endorse-auma-marijuanaGustavo Turner/L.A. Weekly

California’s dominant political party is saying yes to drugs.

The California Democratic Party’s executive board met in Long Beach over the weekend. It voted to endorse a number of ballot measures, including the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), which is headed for your vote in November.

The initiative would legalize holding up to an ounce of weed for those older than 21 — no doctor’s note necessary.

The co-owner of iBake Englewood, who goes by the name Thurlow Weed.7News

The co-owner of iBake Englewood, who goes by the name Thurlow Weed.

Earlier this month, we reported that Englewood had voted to prohibit marijuana clubs in the wake of controversy overiBake, a pot-consumption business with storefronts in the community and Adams County, where officials announced that they were looking at ways to shut down the one there after three years of operation and no reported problems.

Despite the Englewood ban, iBake’s co-owner, Thurlow Weed, expressed his hope that his venue in the community would be grandfathered in by the city council. But a memo authored by acting city attorney Dugan Comer in advance of a city council study session that’s scheduled for tonight outlines the rationale Englewood can use to shutter iBake permanently and suggests that any lawsuits over the action would be unsuccessful.

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